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Looking for great advice on home repair, home improvements and many do-it-yourself projects? Then look to Tom Feiza, Milwaukee's "Mr. Fix-It." Tom has helped millions on a broad range of home-related topics. The right column contains a list of chapters from Tom's book "Just Fix It". If you find this information useful you will enjoy Tom's book. If you are looking for the How to Operate Your Home website, click here.

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Quick Tip #29 – Patch the Hole Behind the Door

August 31st, 2014 by admin No comments »

So the kids had a little shoving match, knocking against the bedroom door, and the doorknob smashed a hole in the drywall. They had done this before but never punctured completely through the drywall. Those previous dents could be ignored, but the new hole needs to be fixed.

Your experience with patching drywall has taught you there is only one way to achieve a perfect patch – hire a professional. Sure, you can spread some spackling compound or drywall compound over a small hole, but the texture never matches. Worse yet, the sanding creates a huge mess and makes the patch look even larger as the texture is removed.

M059C - Simple Wall Patch_300dpi

 

For the hole created by the doorknob, we have a quick fix: cover it with a circular patch/bumper. The bumper will be slightly raised from the drywall surface, but it will look like it was designed to be there. The bumper will be larger than the hole, creating a sturdy support base, and it can be held in place with construction adhesive.

After the bumper patch is in place, you can paint it to match the wall color.

As a preventive measure for the rest of your house, make sure all doors have a working doorstop or a bumper to prevent doorknobs from striking drywall.

Quick Tip #28 – Stains Around a Toilet = Serious Problem

August 30th, 2014 by admin No comments »

Always be on the lookout for water leaks in your home, including little clues that could indicate bigger problems. For instance, if interior paint is bubbling or loose, you’re likely to find a water leak behind the paint.

Around your toilet, check the vinyl flooring. Any gray stain in the vinyl that can’t be washed away may indicate a leak where the toilet connects to the drainage pipe – or a leak at the wax ring sealing the toilet to the drain pipe flange.

 

P027C - Toilet Leak at Floor_300dpi

 

The gray stain in the vinyl is caused by a small amount of water seeping under the vinyl. Water discolors the subfloor and vinyl; the stain can’t be removed.

Gently rock the toilet from side to side. It should not wobble or slide on the floor. Any movement means there may be a problem that should be checked by a plumber.

If your home has a basement or crawl space, you can also look for signs of drips or wood stains below the toilet. This type of leak is particularly bad because it can cause unseen rot that may require replacement of the subfloor – an expensive repair.

Quick Tip #27 – Plumbing Vent? What Plumbing Vent?

August 18th, 2014 by admin No comments »

All modern plumbing systems in residential construction have a plumbing vent. It doesn’t just vent unwanted odors from the drainage system to the outside; it actually serves an important purpose by supplying air to the system.

The plumbing drainage system in your home is actually called a drainage, waste and vent (DWV) system. When water flows down the piping, an air supply (vent) is needed to allow the water to flow. Think of the vertical pipe as a drinking straw. If you plug the top end of a straw, liquid won’t drain from it.

The DWV system in your home consists of a series of pipes connected to each fixture; they extend above each fixture, and the system terminates at an open pipe that extends through the roof. This piping allows air into the system and prevents unbalanced pressures in the piping.

 

P016C - Drainage, Waste and Vent (DWV) System_300dpi

The vent also prevents the system from drawing water out of a trap at the fixture with the characteristic “glug-glug-glug” as the drain gasps for air. Plumbing traps should drain smoothly and never “glug” or gasp for air.

If your home has a drain that empties slowly or gurgles as it drains, this may indicate a venting problem. If you flush a toilet and the sink gurgles, there’s definitely a vent problem. Have a plumber check this.

Quick Tip #26 – Pop-Up Stopper Sticks

August 11th, 2014 by admin No comments »

P097 - Sink Stopper AdjustmentsMost bathroom sinks have a “pop-up” sink stopper that opens and closes when you operate a small knob or lever built into the faucet. Push it down and the stopper pops up to drain the sink; lift it up and the stopper closes.

Most of these mechanisms need adjustments from time to time, and many are never set just right in the first place. Take a look at the illustration. The rod at the rear of the sink will allow adjustment where the metal strap with holes attaches to the stopper rod. The rod can be placed in holes at different heights to raise or lower the mechanism. The perforated rod also allows a sliding adjustment where it is attached to the solid rod that goes up through the sink.

If the sink is plugged, place a bucket below the sink, then loosen the nut and pull back the rod for the pop-up stopper at the tail piece of the sink drain. (A little water may leak out.) This will disconnect the pop-up stopper, and you can remove it to clear out debris that always collects here.

Quick Tip #25 – Turn That Gas Off

August 4th, 2014 by admin No comments »

Operating Wrench-Type ValveIf your home has natural gas or propane appliances, you should know where the gas valves are located and how to turn them off.

All gas appliances are required to have a special valve located on the pipe near the appliance. Look at your gas cooking range – you should see a valve just behind the unit where the flexible connector connects to the pipe. Also, there should be a valve on the side of a gas furnace or gas water heater.

The illustration shows a typical gas valve that is operated with a small wrench. The valve may have a larger handle you can operate with your hand, and in some newer installations there may be a valve with a large handle. In essence they all work the same: when the handle is parallel to the pipe, the gas is on; when perpendicular to the pipe, the gas is off.

Make sure the valves are off and the pipe is capped if your home has a gas supply line with no appliance connected to it. If you ever smell gas in your home, leave immediately. Call for help from outside your home – you can call the local gas utility or the fire department.

Quick Tip #24 – Compact Fluorescents – Yes, They’re a Good Deal!

July 29th, 2014 by admin No comments »

E124 - Compact Fluorescent LampsOK, for many years compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) were a bit of a pain. They provided an eerie color, took a long time to reach full brightness, never worked outdoors in cold weather, and failed early.

Most of those problems have been solved in the last 20 years. Now it’s hard to resist these lamps, which provide the same amount of light as incandescent lamps for about 25 percent of the energy cost. They also generate about 75 percent less heat inside an air-conditioned space, which is important in areas where air conditioning is used often.

They are color-corrected to provide a natural color. When you purchase the lamps, look for the “warm white” or “natural” color notation on the packaging. The color-corrected CFLs really do have great color. They’re available as spotlights and floodlights, and there are special versions for circuits with light dimmers. The bulbs are small enough to fit in most household lamps and fixtures.

If you do the energy calculation, you’ll see there is a great payback for substituting CFLs over incandescent bulbs. They also last about six to 12 times longer than incandescents.

Quick Tip #23 – Fixing a Drip at the Bathroom Fan

July 22nd, 2014 by admin No comments »

V007 - Bathroom Exhaust Fan ProblemsSo you run the bath exhaust fan to remove moisture – but then you get that drip, drip, drip from the fan on your nice clean rug. Bath exhaust fans should not drip. If yours does, there’s something wrong with it.

First, check the exhaust ducting or tubing; it should be insulated, straight and vented to the outside. There should be a minimum of bends for proper air flow. If there is no insulation around the duct, the problem could be condensation in the cold duct. Adding insulation around the duct may solve the problem.

The fan’s damper can also get stuck in the open position, allowing hot air into the cool duct and creating condensation. Check the small damper at the fan. It should open when the fan is on and close when the fan turns off. This damper responds to fan pressure and gravity. Most vent connectors through the roof or sidewall should also have a damper to keep cold air out, and it should open and close with fan operation.

For many years, contractors installed bath fan vent ducting incorrectly, creating a bend or low loop to catch condensation. This just allows water to accumulate and may cause a large leak when the water lets go.

Quick Tip #22 – The Rain May Drain, But It’s Really Not a Pain

July 14th, 2014 by admin No comments »

P017 - Storm, Sanitary Sewer in StreetWhen a rain gutter and downspout send their discharge below grade to a pipe, it may appear that rainwater is draining into a sanitary sewer, but it really isn’t. In municipal areas with sewer systems, gutter (rainwater) discharge is normally routed into a storm sewer. This storm piping routes water to rivers and streams and is separate from the sanitary sewer system.

Municipal systems include a sanitary sewer system that routes toilet, shower and sink water to a sewage treatment plant. The flow of storm and sanitary sewer systems would never be combined unless a really old system is in place or there are problems with the system. In the old days before good sewage treatment, homes had combined sewers – but that is not common today.

When you live out in the country, your gutters may discharge below grade and be directed underground to the side of a hill or a lower spot. Rural areas don’t have storm sewers.

Here is a tip. Look at the curb and gutter in front of your house. If you see grates there, rainwater flows into a storm sewer system below the street.

Quick Tip #21 – GFCI? What? Why?

July 7th, 2014 by admin No comments »

E125  Safety of GFCI vs. BreakerYou may not know what a GFCI is, but chances are it’s making your home safer. A ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) measures current flowing through a circuit. It looks simple, but it’s really a complex electronic device.

Electricity flows like water through a circuit. The GFCI measures this flow; if the device is operating properly, the flow into and out of the device should be the same. If the GFCI detects a slight leak of current (perhaps through your body), it immediately disconnects the circuit. That’s where the term “ground fault” comes from – the GFCI detects that the current is “grounding” when it’s not supposed to.

What about a circuit breaker or fuse? Wouldn’t one of these detect an imbalance? Circuit breakers and fuses are designed to prevent wires and devices from overheating. A 15-amp breaker will allow 15 amps of power to flow before it trips the circuit. That 15 amps is enough to light more than 15 100-watt bulbs; it’s enough current to kill a person. In fact, just a fraction of an amp flowing through your heart could be fatal. A GFCI will trip before that happens.

Remember to use the test button to check the GFCI periodically. Plug a lamp into the circuit; the lamp should turn off when you push the test button, tripping the GFCI.

Quick Tip #20 – Extension Cord Safety

June 30th, 2014 by admin No comments »

E086 - Extension Cord ProblemsYou should view extension cords as a necessary evil. Avoid using them. If you must use an extension cord, use a heavy duty cord with a sturdy plug and outlet. Make sure the cord is in good condition.

Some basic rules:

  1. Never run an extension cord through a doorway where it could get damaged.
  2. Never run an extension cord under a rug where it can’t be seen and could overheat.
  3. Never run a cord where it could present a trip hazard.
  4. Never use two extension cords end to end – you just double the risk.
  5. Never use a cord with exposed wires or a loose plug or outlet.
  6. Never cut or modify the cord or connectors.

For appliances like washing machines, toasters or hair dryers, don’t use an extension cord, period. Have an electrician install an outlet near the appliance so a cord is not needed. These appliances use lots of energy and can overheat an extension cord.

All permanently installed appliances – a garage door operator or sump pump, for example – must have an electrical outlet nearby so an extension cord is not needed.